Monthly Archives: May 2018

GDPR

GDPR AND HOW IT APPLIES TO PHOTOGRAPHY.

Generally speaking, the introduction of GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) marks a change. In the first place, clients now have to give formal consent to the use of their images. Up to the present time consent was maybe verbal or written into the T&C’s it now has to be formalised and recorded.

Given these points, this means that GDPR consent is transparent. Equally important it is all about the right to privacy of the individual. For this reason by recording an individuals permission, those that really appreciate their image will be happy to promote your business. There will be some who will not want to help you with the promotion. Dealing respectfully with your client’s wishes will enhance your business’s reputation. It’s what is best for your client. Failure to act could cause you bigger issues in the future, possibly a fine.

How can we best avoid this?

For the most part, this process is all about transparency. The most important part of this GDPR process is to get genuine consent. Above all to achieve this you must have a recordable form that the client signs.  As a result, this gives consent to there images use. In addition it is helpful for them to have the option to say no. As a result that no, is only to you displaying their image(s) in your marketing.  For this reason by using the consent form the client feels that it’s important they are being listened too.

Events

It is important to realise that this is a tricky one. Is it reasonable to ask in excess of 20 people to sign consent forms? Do you have to change your approach? Is it reasonable to inform attendees that photography is taking place and for them to let the photographer/organisers know that they do not want their photo taken?

What do you do when you have a smallish group? Do you feel it is reasonable for them to be asked to sign individual consents?

Getting it right

Clients will cooperate and you get to use their image for your marketing, social media etc.

Let me know what you think, contact me here.

Picture of Martin on the GDPR page

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CAMERA HISTOGRAM

CAMERA HISTOGRAM

The camera histogram is one of the most important indicators of how well exposed your photograph is. The graph that is displayed represents on the left shadows, in the middle mid-tones and on the right highlights.
Chart showing camera histogram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you to digital camera world for the graph.

For a well-exposed image, you are looking for a rise from the left bottom corner to a peak in the middle and then dropping down again to the corner on the right. However, remember this is a perfect world.

IN REALITY

The camera histogram graph may have peaks and troughs. Meaning that it might start at the bottom in the left-hand corner Rise to a peak the drop slightly rise to another peal and then drop to the left-hand corner.

Either of these scenarios will indicate a well-exposed image.

BADLY EXPOSED

When looking at the camera histogram what you don’t want to see is the peak starting high on the left-hand side then a gentle curve upwards in the mid tones and then finishing high on the right-hand side. You may also see starting high on the left dropping, rising and dropping in the mid tones then rising high on the right. This indicates a badly exposed image which may be over or underexposed.

CLIPPING

If a portion of the histogram is touching either edge this is called clipping. It means that there is a loss of detail in the image. On the left side, the clipping occurs in the shadows and will be completely black (no detail). On the right side in the highlights will be completely white (no detail).

If a certain portion of the histogram is “touching” either edge, it will indicate loss of detail, also called clipping. Highlight clipping (areas that are completely white and absent detail) occurs if the graph is touching the right side of the histogram. Shadow clipping (areas that are completely black and absent detail) occurs if the graph is touching the left side of the histogram.

HOW CAN YOU CORRECT THE GRAPH ON THE CAMERA HISTOGRAM

The best way to do this is to use a light meter. This way you can set the ISO, aperture and shutter speed to the readings taken. This will give you a well-exposed image. I use the Sekonic L478DR

The other way is adjusting the shutter speed on the camera. This adjusts the exposure. By dialling in a faster speed you will darken the image. If you want to make it lighter then use a slower speed.

You must remember that ensuring you have the correct white balance is also key to this process. See here for further information on white balance here.

Finding these articles interesting? Then let Martin know.

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